Saturday, April 08, 2006

Quote of the Day

"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use." Soren Kierkegaard

This one seems to be very relevant to our society today. Though I am not sure of Kierkegaard's philosophical underpinnings and/or views. We, Americans, much rather demand our rights than work hard (physically or intellectually). Or maybe I'm the only one allergic to manual labor and sometimes want to take a mental shortcut... Or maybe that is just me.

Derrick

6 comments:

Russ said...

I believe that there are those who use their freedom of speech as a scapegoat to being vulgar and foul. Just take a listen to 99.1 radio for a few minutes. Also, I feel that manual labor can mean even having the dedication to working out and staying in shape. My manual labor days were many. I was in good shape just by nature of my working on the railroad or building off-shore oil rigs. Now, I am a teacher. There is no question that I need to be more tenacious in putting some miles on my treadmill.

Derrick Bright said...

I suppose that is where there is a distinction between being a Christian and being an American. As an American, I must, in a s ense, preserve someone's right to be foolish, offensive and foul.

On the other hand, as a Christian, I want to speak out against the filth and garbage out there in a hope to preserve some sense of civility or respectfulness in general society. (I'm not sure those are the words I want.

It is, I think, because of the freedom of speech that Christianity (the Gospel) has been preached so freely. Notice many other cultures: religious freedom is not a right by any stretch of the imagination.

So, it seems a kind of double edged sword. We have the right to express ourselves (even in an unpopular way), but we can also speak out against these things without fear of imminant (sp) death.

Derrick

Russ said...

We do live in an awesome country. It's difficult to find a country where so many faiths, religions, and cultures can be seen in any classroom. This is where teaching by example is required. Teaching Christianity and the Bible is forbidden in a public classroom ( unless a religioua science class). Yet, we can still exibit our Christian spirit in how we interact with everybody. A witness by example is a powerful tool and gift.

Derrick Bright said...

Teaching about Christianity and the Bible is not forbidden; having an alter call or saying that they (or their parents) are wrong for believing something other than Christianity is not professionally advisable.

There are several standards in the State Standards that require us to teach about David and Goliath, and a few other stories from the Bible as it relates to a social studies lesson.

In addition, some grades are expected to be taught that Christianity was an influence on early American culture, and historical figures such as Martin Luther (not MLK Jr-though, arguably, his Christianity was THE basis for equal rights) and His role and reasons for the Reformation.

And I agree that we can be a witness by our life and love and if and when a student asks if or where we go to church, I think it is appropriate to answer then straight forward. Then move on.

What do you think?

Derrick

Russ said...

Where I was coming from was in the context of witnessing to students in the classroom. Studies are allowed, as we teach about many historical factors of which many are religion based. Where the fobidded fruit lies is when we want to tell the students that there is only one true faith. If we tell them that Jesus Christ is the one, the only way to eternal life, then we have crossed the forbidden line in the classroom.

Derrick Bright said...

Russ,
that was how I understood your first assertion and thanks for clarifying. Do you think this applies to the speech given by the high school teacher a few weeks ago where he let his personal animosity for the President spill over into the classroom?

I think what he did was unprofessional and if students were to ask him his view on a subject, I think it would be ok to express it to the tune of "I don't really like some of the President's policies or choices, but now is not the place for me to go any further with this discussion...", but not with the anger and hatred, to a degree that he did.

The key is education, not indoctrination. On the other hand, that is not always what happens as many students are being indoctrinated in the "religion" of secular humanism; but that is definately another discussion for another time. :-)